2-20-2008
Victoria found this page

Internet safety rules for kids

1. I will not give out the following:

  • my name
  • my home or e-mail address
  • my telephone number
  • my parents’ work address / telephone number
  • the name and location of my school
  • my teacher’s name or my grade
2. I will never agree to get together with someone that I met online.
3. I will never send someone my picture or anything else.
4. I will not give out my Internet email password to anyone (even my best friend), other than my parents.
5. I will tell my parents right away if I come across anything that makes me feel uneasy or scared.
6. I will not order or request any item through the Internet.
7. I will be a good online user and not do anything that hurts anyone or is against the law.
http://www.bramlib.on.ca/safety.htm

alex found this page
That’s what 10news.com in southern California cites consumer privacy experts as saying. The videogame 10news refers to is Battlefield 2142 by Electronic Arts, which, when installed on a PC, also installs spyware. If the spyware creates problems in running your computer, a source says, the game company recommends that the customer uninstall one of Microsoft’s security updates. Doing so would render the computer vulnerable to compromising security hacks. The upshot of this story: read the fine print before installing a computer game.

Tara found this website at http://www.fbi.gov/kids/k5th/safety2.htm
http://netfamilynews.org/newsletter.shtml#newsitemEEyyZAkpApSaQUdhjW
There are some very important things that you need to keep in mind when you're on your computer at home or at school.
  • First, remember never to give out personal information such as your name, home address, school name, or telephone number in a chat room or on bulletin boards. Also, never send a picture of yourself to someone you chat with on the computer without your parent's permission.
  • Never write to someone who has made you feel uncomfortable or scared.
  • Do not meet someone or have them visit you without the permission of your parents.
  • Tell your parents right away if you read anything on the Internet that makes you feel uncomfortable.
  • Remember that people online may not be who they say they are. Someone who says that "she" is a "12-year-old girl" could really be an older man.


Mrs. Cassinelli found this website: http://www.safeteens.com/teenrules.htm
Basic Rules of Online Safety for Teens
The most important thing to remember is that when you’re online in any kind of a public forum, you’re out in public and anyone can read whatever you post. You should never post anything on the Internet that you wouldn’t want known to the public at large. You should also remember that people you meet in cyberspace might not be who they seem to be. If you’re in any type of public forum, avoid giving out your full name, your mailing address, your telephone number, the name of your school, or any other information that could help someone determine your actual identity. The same applies to your family and friends. Never reveal anything about other people that could possibly get them into trouble. The biggest danger to your safety is if you get together with someone you “meet” online. Remember, you never know for certain if people you meet online are who they say they are. If you do feel it’s appropriate
1. Keep Your Identity Private
If you’re in any type of public forum, avoid giving out your full name, your mailing address, your telephone number, the name of your school, or any other information that could help someone determine your actual identity. The same applies to your family and friends. Never reveal anything about other people that could possibly get them into trouble.
2. Never Get Together with Someone You "Meet” Online]
The biggest danger to your safety is if you get together with someone you “meet” online. Remember, you never know for certain if people you meet online are who they say they are. If you do feel it’s appropriate to meet with someone, discuss it with your parents and never go to the meeting by yourself. Arrange to meet in a public place like a coffee shop or mall that you, not just the other person, are familiar and comfortable with, and never go alone. The safest procedure is to have your parents talk with the parents of the other person and for both of you to bring your parents along on the first meeting.
3. Never Respond To E Mail Chat Comments, Instant Messages Or Other Messages That Are Hostile, Belligerent, Inappropriate Or In Any Way Make You Feel Uncomfortable
It isn’t your fault if you get a message that is mean or in any way makes you feel uncomfortable. If you get such a message, don’t respond. Instead, show it to your parents or a trusted adult to see if there is anything you can do to make it stop. Sending a response just encourages the person.
4. Talk with your Parents About Their Expectations and Ground Rules for Going Online
It’s important that you and your parents are on the same “channel” when it comes to your online activities. This includes when you can go online, how long you can stay online, and what activities you can do online. Communicating with your parents doesn’t mean that you have to give up your privacy. It just means that you come to an agreement based on mutual trust and understanding. While you’re at it, perhaps you can help your parents better understand the Internet, what it can be used for, and how it is helpful for teens


Keeley found this website http://www.safekids.com/kidsrules.htm

Kids' Rules for Online Safety
1.
I will not give out personal information such as my address, telephone number, parents’ work address/telephone number, or the name and location of my school without my parents’ permission.

2.
I will tell my parents right away if I come across any information that makes me feel uncomfortable.
3.
I will never agree to get together with someone I "meet" online without first checking with my parents. If my parents agree to the meeting, I will be sure that it is in a public place and bring my mother or father along.
4.
I will never send a person my picture or anything else without first checking with my parents.
5.
I will not respond to any messages that are mean or in any way make me feel uncomfortable. It is not my fault if I get a message like that. If I do I will tell my parents right away so that they can contact the service provider.
6.
I will talk with my parents so that we can set up rules for going online. We will decide upon the time of day that I can be online, the length of time I can be online and appropriate areas for me to visit. I will not access other areas or break these rules without their permission.
7.
I will not give out my Internet password to anyone (even my best friends) other than my parents.
8.
I will check with my parents before downloading or installing software or doing anything that could possibly hurt our computer or jeopardize my family’s privacy
9.
I will be a good online citizen and not do anything that hurts other people or is against the law.
10.
I will help my parents understand how to have fun and learn things online and teach them things about the Internet, computers and other technology.