2-20-2008
Celia found this at:
http://www.netsmartz.org/news/sep03-01.htm

Tips to Help When Your Child is Bullied Online Are your children being bullied on the Internet and you don’t know what to do about it? You are not alone. One in four children in the United Kingdom was the victim of online bullying in 2001. And in the United States a popular site, www.schoolrumors.com, had to be closed down for technical reasons after receiving 70,000 visits in just a few weeks. Visitors to this site could "click on a particular high school and post their own insults of real students using a false name." Cyber bullying is yet another problem that parents and children are facing in this new Internet era.

Cyber bullying involves the use of information and technology such as e-mail, instant messaging, the publishing of defamatory personal web sites, and online personal polling web sites that are used to support conscious, willful, deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by one or more people with the intent to harm others.
According to one victim, the difference between being bullied at school and being bullied on the Internet is that you cannot get away from cyber bullying as easily. Cyber bullying follows you, even after you get home from school.
There is hope. Here are some tips to help you protect your children against cyber bullying.
  • Make sure your children do not respond to rude and harassing e-mails, messages, and postings. Keep a record of them in case you need proof. Call law enforcement and inform your Internet Service Provider (ISP) if necessary.
  • Use web sites that translate the lingo your children are sending or receiving so that you can understand the words that are being used in e-mails and chatrooms.
  • If your children continue to receive harassing e-mails, have them delete their current accounts and open a new one. This new e-mail address should only be given to a few people they can trust with it.
  • If your children are receiving harassing messages through instant messaging, help them make use of the “block” or “ban” feature. This feature can be used to block certain individuals from being able to reach your child.
  • If you have found that a cyber bully has set up a web site that is defaming or mocking your child, contact your ISP and, if necessary, also inform law enforcement to try to get that web site removed.
  • Get your child’s school involved. Learn what the school’s policy on cyber bullying is, and urge the administrators to take a stance against all forms of bullying.

2-20-2008
Anthony found this at
http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/resources/special_initiatives/wa_resources/wa_shared/backgrounders/challenge_cyber_bullying.cfm
Challenging Cyber Bullying

Cyber bullying and the law
Young people should be aware that some forms of online bullying are considered criminal acts. Under the Criminal Code of Canada, it is a crime to communicate repeatedly with someone if your communication causes them to fear for their own safety or the safety of others.
It's also a crime to publish a “defamatory libel” – writing something that is designed to insult a person or likely to injure a person's reputation by exposing him or her to hatred, contempt or ridicule.
A cyber bully may also be violating the Canadian Human Rights Act, if he or she spreads hate or discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status or disability.

The role of Internet service providers (ISPs) and cell phone service providers
Internet service providers (ISPs) are the companies that provide Internet access to consumers. Most ISPs have Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) that clearly define privileges and guidelines for those using their services, and the actions that can be taken if those guidelines are violated.

ISPs and cell phone service providers can respond to reports of cyber bullying over their networks, or help clients track down the appropriate service provider to respond to.

Taking action on cyber bullying
Cyber bullying is everyone’s business and the best response is a pro-active or preventative one.

What parents can do:Get involved and be aware
Learn everything you can about the Internet and what your kids are doing online. Talk to them about the places they go online and the activities that they are involved in. Be aware of what your kids are posting on Web sites, including their own personal home pages.
    • Encourage your kids to come to you if anybody says or does something online that makes them feel uncomfortable or threatened. Stay calm and keep the lines of communication and trust open. If you “freak out” your kids won’t turn to you for help when they need it.
  • Encourage kids to develop their own moral code so they will choose to behave ethically online.
    • Talk to your kids about responsible Internet use.
    • Teach them to never post or say anything on the Internet that they wouldn’t want the whole world - including you - to read.
    • Create an online agreement or contract for computer use, with your kids’ input. Make sure your agreement contains clear rules about ethical online behaviour. MNet's research shows that in homes where parents have clear rules against certain kinds of activities, young people are much less likely to engage in them.
  • Take action if your child is being bullied online
    • Watch out for signs that your child is being bullied online – a reluctance to use the computer or go to school may be an indication.
    • If the bully is a student at your child’s school, meet with school officials and ask for help in resolving the situation.
    • Report any incident of online harassment and physical threats to your local police and your Internet Service Provider (ISP).
    • If your child is bullied through a mobile phone, report the problem to your phone service provider. If it’s a persistent problem you can change the phone number.
What schools can do
  • Integrate curriculum-based anti-bullying programs into classrooms.
  • Educate teachers, students and parents about the seriousness of cyber bullying.
  • Change the school or board’s bullying policy to include harassment perpetrated with mobile and Internet technology. There should be serious consequences for anyone who doesn’t follow the guidelines.
  • Update the school or board’s computer Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) to specifically prohibit using the Internet for bullying.
What kids can do

Because most incidents of bullying occur off adults' radar screens, it’s important that young people learn to protect themselves online and respond to cyber bullying among peers when they encounter it.

Guidelines for children and teens:
  • Guard your contact information. Don't give people you don't know your cell phone number, instant messaging name or e-mail address.
  • If you are being harassed online, take the following actions immediately:
    • Tell an adult you trust – a teacher, parent, older sibling or grandparent.
    • If you are being harassed, leave the area or stop the activity (i.e. chat room, news group, online gaming area, instant messaging, etc.).
    • If you are being bullied through e-mail or instant messaging, block the sender’s messages. Never reply to harassing messages.
    • Save any harassing messages and forward them to your Internet Service Provider (i.e. Hotmail or Yahoo). Most service providers have appropriate use policies that restrict users from harassing others over the Internet – and that includes kids!
    • If the bullying includes physical threats, tell the police as well.
  • Take a stand against cyber bullying with your peers. Speak out whenever you see someone being mean to another person online. Most kids respond better to criticism from their peers than to disapproval from adults.

Victoria found this page
Schoolyard bullies get nastier online
(an excerpt from schoolyard bullies get nastier online)
By Jon Swartz, USA TODAY
SAN FRANCISCO
'No one can help you'
"You feel as if no one can help you," says Alyssa, 14, who waited two weeks before telling her mother she was being bullied by a boy who called her a "loser" and "stupid" in instant messages. "It's a lonely, scary feeling."
The problem appears to be growing, as more kids chat on the Internet. Half of 3,000 U.S. children surveyed the past six months said they or someone they know have been victims or guilty of cyberbullying, WiredSafety.org says.
In Louisiana, a 15-year-old girl was arrested in January and accused of "cyberstalking," posting photos of a male student on a Web site.
At Oak View Elementary School in Fairfax, Va., last year, sixth-grade students conducted an online poll to determine the ugliest classmate, school officials say.
Cyberbullying is so pervasive in Westchester County, N.Y., that officials held a half-day conference last month for students, parents, teachers and law-enforcement officials. Six hundred attended.
When 200 students were asked how many had been a victim or perpetrator, or had a friend who was either, all but six raised their hands, county officials say.
The Internet has changed the dynamics of schoolyard bullying, counselors and teachers say. Before, a big, intimidating boy typically pushed people around or stared them down. Now, the technically astute — boys and girls — harass for different reasons.
url: http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2005-03-06-cover-cyberbullies_x.htm<span style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">


Alex W found this info at http://www.microsoft.com/protect/family/activities/chatrooms.mspx on 5/08/07

5 safety tips for chat rooms

1.
Never give out your personal information in a chat room.
2.
Never agree to meet a stranger in person whom you met in a chat room.
3.
When you're asked to enter or sign up for a chat nickname, choose a name that doesn't give away your personal information. For example, you might use SavvySue instead of DetroitSue.
4.
Be wary of other chatters who ask you to meet in private chat rooms.
5.
Check the terms and conditions, code of conduct, and privacy statement at the chat site before you begin chatting.
6 chat room safety tips for kids
1.
Monitor your child's use of chat. Remember, kids can participate in chats using Web sites, chat software programs, cell phones, and even some online games.
2.
Tell your child that if something in a chat room makes them feel uncomfortable, they should immediately leave the chat room and tell an adult.
3.
Insist that your child never send photographs of themselves to anyone they meet in a chat room.
4.
Learn the chat lingo. Kids often communicate using shorthand. For example, POS means "Parent over Shoulder."
5.
Tell kids to stick to moderated chats.
6.
Consider software designed to help keep your kids safer online, such as Windows Live OneCare Family Safety and the Parental Controls included in the Windows Vista operating system.

Ryan T found this info on http://www.kidshealth.org/teen/safety/safebasics/internet_safety.html

Cyberbullying

It's not just strangers who can make you feel uncomfortable online. Cyberbullying refers to cruel or bullying messages sent to you online. These might be from former friends or other people you know. They can be irritating and, in some cases, even frightening.
If you get these bullying messages online, it's often better to ignore them rather than answer them. Cyberbullies, just like other bullies, may be angry or disturbed people — and may be looking for attention or a reaction.
Fortunately, most people never experience cyberbullying. But if you're getting cyberbullied and ignoring it doesn't make it go away, getting help from a parent, school counselor, or another trusted adult may be a good idea. That's especially true if the cyberbullying contains threats.


Madison found this website: http://www.fightcrime.org/cyberbullying/10stepslong.pdf

Ten Steps for Families to Stop Cyber Bullying

1. Kids should tell an adult if they have been cyber bullied or know other kids who have been cyber
bullied. They should report to their parents, a teacher or the police any messages or postings that are
mean, embarrassing or threatening to themselves or other students.
2. Parents should insist that every school in America has a proven anti-bullying program so that students
feel safe in their schools and know whom to talk to in the event they feel threatened. The Olweus
Bullying Prevention Program effectively addresses cyber bullying and other forms of bullying. Parents
should also tell their members of Congress to support the Bullying Prevention Bill that would help states establish anti-bullying programs.

3. Parents should insist that all schools establish a relationship
with local law enforcement agencies so that they can help
school officials curb cyber bullying, including informing
students that Internet and other electronic communication
can be traced.
4. Parents should look for signs that their child might be a victim
of cyber bullying, including having nightmares, avoiding school,
acting sad or withdrawn, or suddenly showing disinterest in
computers or rapidly switching screens.
5. Parents should discuss cyber bullying and bullying with their kids, encourage their kids to tell them if
they have been bullied and let them know it is wrong to do it themselves. Parents should also discuss
with their kids what kinds of Internet activities the kids enjoy.
6. Parents should keep computers used by children in common areas of the home.
7. Emails, chats, text messages including instant messages and web pages sent or posted by bullies should
be saved as evidence.
8. Parents should instruct their kids: one, don’t respond to bullying messages; two, if the messages
continue, take a break and then reply strongly telling the sender to stop; three, block or filter all
further messages; four, if necessary, change their email address, account, username or phone number.
9. Kids should not give out ANY private information such as full names, addresses, phone numbers,
personal identification numbers, passwords, school names or names of family members or friends. Kids
should not say anything in a chat room or post anything to a web site that they would not want to be
made public. Kids should use a screen name different from their email address.
10. If children are cyber bullied, families should file complaints with the Internet service provider, cell
phone company or web site. Cyber bullying is typically a violation of the “terms of use” and violators are subject to adverse action.

This webstie was found by Georgie at http://www.globalgateway.org.uk/Default.aspx?page=394 Preventing online bullying A report into bullying by NCH in 2002 recorded that one in four British children said they had been bullied via the internet or their mobile phones. The web gives bullies anonymity and children are at risk from receiving threatening or upsetting emails, or being the subject of cruel online pranks. As a teacher, it's important that you understand online bullying and know what you can do to prevent it. Bullying by email
  • Establish a reporting procedure so that bullied children know who they can turn to if they are affected.
  • Children should not respond to bullies' messages and seek help from a teacher, parent or carer. Tell them not to delete the message as it is evidence of bullying.
  • If the email is being sent from a personal email account, abuse should be reported to the sender's email service provider. Many email programs also provide facilities to block email from certain senders.
  • If the bullying emails continue, and the email address of the sender is not obvious, then it may be possible to track the address using special software. Your email service provider should be able to offer assistance in doing this.
  • In certain cases, it may be easier for the child to change their email address, and then exercise caution over who this new address is given to. Bullying within chat rooms or by instant messaging
  • Chatrooms have an element of anonymity so children may often have the confidence to say things online which they would not say face to face. Whilst this can be a positive thing for some children, it can also lead to bullying. Groups are often formed in chatrooms just as they would be in school, and can be used as a way of excluding or harassing others.
  • Encourage children to always use moderated chatrooms, and to never give out personal information while chatting. If bullying does occur, they should not respond to messages, but should leave the chat room, and seek advice from a teacher, parent or carer. If using a moderated chat room, the system moderators should also be informed, giving as much detail as possible, so that they can take appropriate action.
  • IM is a form of online chat but is private between two, or more, people. The system works on the basis of 'buddy lists', where chat can only take place with those on your list. Children should only add people to their buddy list that they know, and reject requests from others to join their list.
  • If a child is bullied or harassed by IM, the service provider should be informed giving the nickname or ID, date, time and details of the problem. The service provider will then take appropriate action which could involve a warning or disconnection from the IM service. If a child has experienced bullying in this way, it might also be worth re-registering for instant messaging with a new user ID. Bullying by websites
  • Although less common, bullying via websites is still a problem for some children. Such bullying generally takes the form of websites that mock, torment, harass or are otherwise offensive, often aimed at an individual or group of people.
  • If a child discovers a bullying website referring to them, they should seek help from a teacher, parent or carer. Pages should be copied and printed, and the ISP that hosts the site should be contacted immediately. The ISP can take steps to find out who posted the site, and request that it is removed.
  • Additionally, many websites and forum services now provide facilities for visitors to create online votes and polls, which have been used by bullies to humiliate and embarrass their fellow pupils. Again, any misuse of such services should be reported to a teacher, parent or carer who should then take steps to contact the host to request the removal of the poll. Strategies for preventing online bullying
  • Awareness of general internet safety practices can help to reduce the risk of online bullying, and generally ensure that children remain safe when online or using any technology. The following hints and tips are adapted from those provided by www.cyberbullying.org, and could be used as a basis for class discussion by teachers. Keep personal information private
  • Personal information should be kept private at all times. This includes details such as name, address, email address, home and mobile phone numbers, school name, membership of clubs, or information on family and friends. If bullies don't have access to this information, the less likely they are to be able to abuse it.
  • Don't believe everything you read. Just because someone online tells you that they are 15 doesn't mean they are telling the truth. Even adults can't tell when a male pretends to be a female or a 50 year old pretends to be a 15 year old.
  • Use netiquette. Be polite to others online as you would offline. If someone treats you rudely, or is mean, you should not respond. Chances are that the bully will see that they are having no effect, and stop the abusive messages. If not, and the abusive messages continue, seek help from a teacher, parent or carer.
  • Never send messages when angry. Wait until you have calmed down and had time to think. Do your best to make sure that your messages are calmly and factually written. You will usually regret sending an angry message, otherwise known as a flame, to someone later on. Once you've sent a message, it's extremely difficult to undo the damage that such flames can do.
  • Never open a message from someone you don't know. Delete strange emails from people you don't know. If in doubt, seek advice from a teacher, parent or carer. If it doesn't look or feel right, it probably isn't. Trust your instincts.
  • If you ever see anything on the internet, or receive an email or text message that makes you feel uncomfortable, switch off the computer and seek advice from an adult.
  • Don't reply to messages from cyberbullies. Even though you may really want to, this is exactly what cyberbullies want. They want to know that they've got you worried and upset. Don't give them that pleasure.
  • Protect yourself. Never arrange to meet someone you have met online. Don't keep bullying to yourselfMake sure kids know they are not alone and that they know the school will take bullying seriously. Establish a reporting procedure that every child knows about. This website was found by Tara at http://www.kidshealth.org/teen/safety/safebasics/internet_safety.html===

Cyberbullying

It's not just strangers who can make you feel uncomfortable online. Cyberbullying refers to cruel or bullying messages sent to you online. These might be from former friends or other people you know. They can be irritating and, in some cases, even frightening.
If you get these bullying messages online, it's often better to ignore them rather than answer them. Cyberbullies, just like other bullies, may be angry or disturbed people — and may be looking for attention or a reaction.
Fortunately, most people never experience cyberbullying. But if you're getting cyberbullied and ignoring it doesn't make it go away, getting help from a parent, school counselor, or another trusted adult may be a good idea. That's especially true if the cyberbullying contains threats.

Lauren found this awesome website about Online Bullying.... Sad stuff.....

http://www.besafeonline.org/English/bullying_online.htm

Bullies will use many ways to get at their victims and the Internet gives them yet another method. This form of bullying is sometimes called cyber bullying and describes the misuse of email systems or the Internet for harassing people, such as by sending unpleasant or aggressive messages. Although this is a recent phenomenon and may not yet be taken seriously by everyone, bullying of all kinds is wrong and should be challenged. The good news is that there are some direct practical steps that you can take to help your child if they are a victim.
  • if a name is not familiar, it may be saferv not to open the email
  • if the sender is a known bully or if they have sent unpleasant or annoying messages before, then ignore it and delete it straight away
  • if the bullying happens through a personal email account, report it to the sender’s email account provider – you can find this address after the @ sign
  • if it is not obvious who the sender is and there is continual bullying using email, then there are tools to trace senders. To find out more about this email tracking, go to one of the search engines, (e.g. Google, Yahoo, etc) and type in “email tracking software” - this software can then be downloaded. Once you know the identity of the bully, get in touch with your Internet Service Provider (ISP) who can then block the sender from your email.
  • if the email bullying is occurring in school, then this should be dealt with through the school’s anti-bullying policy. > ||

external image up_arrow_2.gif
Bullying on the Internet You may be aware of recent episodes where people have been victimised via websites – one incident involved pupils setting up an offensive website about their teachers. Of course, the victim may not always be aware that these sites exist. However, if your child realises that they have been bullied in this way, then the first course of action is to contact your ISP. They can find out who runs the site and can request that it is removed. If the person responsible is at school with your child, then let the headteacher know. Any false accusations or anything on the website which you feel is breaking the law should be reported to the police.

external image up_arrow_2.gif
Text messages Although this does not involve the Internet, it is worth mentioning that bullying can also be carried out using text messaging on mobile phones. Practical steps you can take include:
  • Encourage your son/daughter to tell you or another responsible adult if they receive unwelcome text messages.
  • Get your child to change their number or even get a new phone.
  • Advise your child to be careful about giving out their mobile number.
  • Send a text message yourself warning the bully that it is an offence to use the mobile phone in this way.
  • Trace the number and report the offender to the phone company. ||
General Advice
  • Remember the Golden Rules.
  • Do not give out personal information too freely.
  • Always encourage your child to tell you of anything that upsets them.
  • Keep a record of all bullying incidences either by saving or printing emails.
  • If an email or text message is particularly disturbing or breaks the law, contact the police.
  • Check on your school’s anti-bullying policy and whether it addresses bullying using computers and mobile phones. If not, encourage them to look at this issue, if necessary with support from your PTA and School Board. ||


tHIS HOPEFULLY INFO WAS FOUND BY sTeVeN. I hope this can help at least one person.. or that could be too high of an expectation. Well without futher adoo, heres the website http://www.besafeonline.org/English/bullying_online.htm
ty for at least reading the first three lines




Bullies will use many ways to get at their victims and the Internet gives them yet another method. This form of bullying is sometimes called cyber bullying and describes the misuse of email systems or the Internet for harassing people, such as by sending unpleasant or aggressive messages. Although this is a recent phenomenon and may not yet be taken seriously by everyone, bullying of all kinds is wrong and should be challenged. The good news is that there are some direct practical steps that you can take to help your child if they are a victim.

  • if a name is not familiar, it may be safer not to open the email
  • if the sender is a known bully or if they have sent unpleasant or annoying messages before, then ignore it and delete it straight away
  • if the bullying happens through a personal email account, report it to the sender’s email account provider – you can find this address after the @ sign
  • if it is not obvious who the sender is and there is continual bullying using email, then there are tools to trace senders. To find out more about this email tracking, go to one of the search engines, (e.g. Google, Yahoo, etc) and type in “email tracking software” - this software can then be downloaded. Once you know the identity of the bully, get in touch with your Internet Service Provider (ISP) who can then block the sender from your email.
  • if the email bullying is occurring in school, then this should be dealt with through the school’s anti-bullying policy. > ||
Kasey found this website http://www.netbullies.com/pages/1/index.htm




Where Do You Report It?
There is no easy answer about where you should report bullying online. It depends on a number of circumstances, like the kind of communications, the level of harassment and when and how the communications are made.
Schools may try and take action when a student is bullied online. But they often find themselves defending an expensive lawsuit brought by the irate parent of the bully charging them with overstepping their authority. Schools have limited authority to address actions that take place outside of school grounds and off-hours unless it is a school-sponsored activity. Since most netbullying occurs from the bully's home computer after school, it may be outside fo the scope of a school's authority.
Unless the school plans carefully in advance and builds their authority into their acceptable use contracts, they may not be authorized to act.
Law enforcement is typically unprepared to deal with cyberharassment cases, specially when children are involved. They may be unable to conduct a cyber-investigation, and may not be able to find a crime to hang their hat on. While many cases of bullying online may be illegal, especially when hacking and death threats are involved, much of what occurs is not a crime.
ISPs are often the best place to start, after the bully's parents have been contacted, or if the victim doesn't know for sure the identity fo their bully. Most netbullying violates the ISPs terms of service. And if the case is recorded and reported correctly, the ISP may shut down the netbully's account.


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external image up_arrow_2.gif
Bullying on the Internet You may be aware of recent episodes where people have been victimised via websites – one incident involved pupils setting up an offensive website about their teachers. Of course, the victim may not always be aware that these sites exist. However, if your child realises that they have been bullied in this way, then the first course of action is to contact your ISP. They can find out who runs the site and can request that it is removed. If the person responsible is at school with your child, then let the headteacher know. Any false accusations or anything on the website which you feel is breaking the law should be reported to the police.
RETURN TO TOP OF PAGE
external image up_arrow_2.gif
Text messages Although this does not involve the Internet, it is worth mentioning that bullying can also be carried out using text messaging on mobile phones. Practical steps you can take include:
  • Encourage your son/daughter to tell you or another responsible adult if they receive unwelcome text messages.
  • Get your child to change their number or even get a new phone.
  • Advise your child to be careful about giving out their mobile number.
  • Send a text message yourself warning the bully that it is an offence to use the mobile phone in this way.
  • Trace the number and report the offender to the phone company. ||
RETURN TO TOP OF PAGE
external image up_arrow_2.gif
General Advice
  • Remember the Golden Rules.
  • Do not give out personal information too freely.
  • Always encourage your child to tell you of anything that upsets them.
  • Keep a record of all bullying incidences either by saving or printing emails.
  • If an email or text message is particularly disturbing or breaks the law, contact the police.
  • Check on your school’s anti-bullying policy and whether it addresses bullying using computers and mobile phones. If not, encourage them to look at this issue, if necessary with support from your PTA and School Board. ||